Culture » Lisbon Events Calendar

Lisbon Events Calendar

Logistics for planning things to do for an excellent day (or week, or month) in and around Lisbon, in English. ATTENTION: Most of the top museums in Lisbon have closed due to the attempt to contain the Coronavirus. There will likely be last-minute cancellations on events until mid-May and possibly beyond, so for now, it’s best to call and check if the event you fancy is still going on just in case.
Jul
5
Sun
2020
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 5 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
6
Mon
2020
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 6 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
7
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 7 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 7 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
8
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 8 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 8 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
9
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 9 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 9 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
10
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 10 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 10 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
11
Sat
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 11 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 11 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
12
Sun
2020
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 12 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
13
Mon
2020
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 13 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
14
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 14 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 14 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
15
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 15 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€
Jul 15 @ 11:00 – 18:00
to Jul 15 | HISTORICAL EXHIBITION | Belém: Demolition to Stage | Belém | 1,50-6€ @ Padrão dos Descobrimentos | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

80 years ago, Portugal celebrated 800 years of itself. As a result, the now highly popular tourist destination that is Belém underwent a few significant changes.

Here’s some more detailed history from the organizers of this historical exhibit:
“In 1940, the Portuguese World Exhibition and Belém seemed to be one. The vast dimension of the event took over the neighborhood. The Estado Novo announced admirable changes in those empty lands, available to host such a great party. But what was this place before 1940?

In addition to the uncultivated land, the neighborhood had a dense, varied and attractive urban core. People lived and traded on streets, lanes and streets consolidated over the centuries, growing in urbanity, since Infante D. Henrique had built a first church there, that of Santa Maria de Belém. This urban and popular nucleus complemented the erudite and noble character conferred by the surrounding farms and palaces – such as the Palácio da Praia (where today is the Centro Cultural de Belém), demolished only in 1962, or the Palácio de Belém, transformed into the official residence of the Presidency of the Republic, after 1910.

The preparation of the Portuguese World Exhibition involved a significant number of demolitions, which amputated the neighborhood in many of its valences: urban structure, housing, commercial spaces, places of sociability, market, and even heritage buildings.

Today, at the beginning of the 21st century, the Portuguese World Exhibition remains in place, in physical structures that we can see and touch, but above all in an incorporeal way.

‘BELÉM: DEMOLIR TO STAGE’ follows this path. It is an exhibition curated by Pedro Rito Nobre that will take us on a journey through the memories that still exist in this place, and others that have been erased. ‘With this exhibition, I hope that the public (in general, and especially those who know Belém today, including the residents) will gain a sense of how Belém has evolved and transformed over time. We get used to places as we know them and sometimes we do not question what was there before, or the reasons why they were transformed. Many of the spaces that we cross today are direct heirs of the Portuguese World Exhibition and some almost surprising or misfit elements are, after all, remains of that event.'”

ENTRY: 1,50-6€.

More info here.

Jul
16
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 16 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
17
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 17 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
18
Sat
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 18 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
21
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 21 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
22
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 22 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
23
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 23 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
24
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 24 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
25
Sat
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 25 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
28
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 28 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
29
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 29 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
30
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 30 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Jul
31
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Jul 31 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
1
Sat
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 1 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
4
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 4 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
5
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 5 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
6
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 6 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
7
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 7 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
8
Sat
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 8 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
11
Tue
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 11 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
12
Wed
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 12 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
13
Thu
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 13 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

Aug
14
Fri
2020
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€
Aug 14 @ 10:00 – 17:00
MUSEUM | CCB Reopens to te Public | Belém | FREE-5€ @ CCB | Lisboa | Lisboa | Portugal

Museums. Remember those things? They used to be boring. Until you couldn’t visit them anymore. Then you started to miss them…
Well, guess what? Monday, May 18th happens to be International Museum Day. And, to celebrate (seeing that Portugal has been handling the global pandemic thing relatively well), many of Lisbon’s museums are cautiously opening some of its doors — provided that you don’t act like a dumbass.

One such museum is Centro Cultural de Belem (CCB). And here’s what they say:
“Garagem Sul CCB reopens on International Museum Day, with the exhibition O Mar É a Nossa Terra (“The Sea is Our Land”), with free entry. After that day, it is open from Tuesday to Sunday, from 10 am to 5 pm.
Now, all visitors can walk through the exhibition accompanied by an explanatory audio guide, accessible via your mobile phone (we recommend that you bring your headphones).
For the youngest, we designed an “actividário”, a set of challenges and puzzles that lead families to discover the secrets of the Portuguese coastline.
The attendance to the public at the Ticket Office is resumed, between 3 pm and 8 pm, although the rule of preference for information and return of tickets by non-face-to-face means remains, as a contention measure of contagion.

The Berardo Collection Museum reopens to the public, under the conditions defined by FAMC-CB.

#CCBCidadeDigital will continue to make digital content freely available, every week, on Wednesdays and Fridays.”

Learn more here.

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