Tamara Alves and Raquel Belli at Underdogs10

Local artist Tamara Alves has left a beautiful mark on the streets of Lisbon with her easily recognizable murals of melancholy half-naked he-/she-wolves and he-/she-foxes in various stages of violence and love.

This year Tamara has ventured inside, and her very first solo show is appropriately being hosted by underdog art gallery Underdogs10. The paintings and drawings on display focus mostly on wolves and cars, inspired in part by the sex and violence of David Cronenberg’s film Crash.

Joining Tamara in her indoor debut is local with Italian roots, mother, photographer, and visual artist Raquel Belli. Raquel has recently traveled to East Timor, where she studied and picked up the basketry and weaving techniques of its various regions. She then incorporated said techniques into her already impressive photographs.

The show is free to enter and inspiring, albeit rather small. But it’s only up until March 7th, so, if you’ve been asleep, here’s a quick look at works by both artists:

Share:

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on pinterest
Pinterest
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
On Key

Related Posts

Tim Burton and his Marionetas

The art of stop motion film dates way back to the mid-1800s. Its history is rich and complicated, sprinkled not just with puppets but also with trippy, hard-to-pronounce stuff like

What’s On in Lisbon in October

The shops, cafes, and restaurants have finally returned from their Férias, you aren’t melting as much, and the kids are settled back at school. Finally, you can enjoy some culture. We’ve gathered some of the best art, music, and other events in the city in October so you can plan your visit!

What’s On in Lisbon in September

The tourists have left, the Lisboetas who run the city’s coolest restaurants and clubs are back, and the summer is far from over. September is one of the best months to be in the city — here’s why.

What’s On in Lisbon in August

Lisbon might feel a little emptier than usual. Or at least the ratio of Portuguese-to-tourists has shifted substantially since so many Lisboetas have jumped in cars and on trains, planes,

Share your thoughts!

Newsletter

Subscribe to
the Atlas Lisboa Newsletter

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close